Glaciers, Climate, and Society
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Welcome to Glaciers, Climate, and Society

 

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Glacier hazards have become critical issues for societies and policy makers in mountainous regions worldwide. Glaciers can always generate disasters, but global climate change exacerbates the risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) and glacier avalanches.

During the last century, tens of thousands of people in the Andes, Himalayas, Alps, Rockies, and other mountains have perished in glacier catastrophes. Vulnerable populations' ability to adapt to global warming depends on successful glacier hazard mitigation.

To increase international awareness, share information, facilitate research, and ultimately save lives and protect infrastructure below dangerous glaciers, this website is designed to disseminate critical information about glacier hazards across regional and national boundaries.

The bibliography provides references for the study of glacier hazards and society. It is organized by theme and by region—and it highlights the often-ignored research in the social sciences and humanities.

The resources page features information about the work and websites of individual researchers, government agencies, university groups, data centers, NGOs, IGOs, and more. Direct links to the most valuable online resources are also included in each entry.

The pages on climate, hazards, water, and human dimensions highlight a few aspects of glacier research. To learn more about my team's work in South America, visit the Andes Research page.

Finally, the K-12 Education page provides a great starting point for teachers, students, and parents to learn about glaciers and climate change.

Please contact us to contribute references, link to your research, share news, or recommend improvements to this website.

For information on the Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Initiative at the University of Oregon, including the 3rd annual student conference and keynote lectures in Dec. 2014, visit the conference's website or contact Mark Carey.